a party studio

Printable party supplies, ideas and creativity

Pink and White Damask Baby Shower August 10, 2011

I just love damask. I think it is so pretty and also from a design point of view, it can be very versatile. I recently designed a range of party printables for a girl baby shower. Classic, clean lines, pretty and soft. I love it and hope one of my girlfriends has a baby soon so that I can use this!

Check out this adorable invite:

Here are the personalized cupcake toppers and the food labels:

The full range is available now in my Etsy store! The complete set includes:
1. invite- either 4×6 or 5×7
2. “BABY” banner
3. hang tags (personalized)
4. cupcake toppers (personalized)
5. cupcake wrappers
6. buffet/food labels (blank)
7. water bottle wrappers (personalized)
8. thank you OR advice note cards (personalized)

Of course, as with all my designs changes can be made. Take a look at these water bottle wrappers. The background can be changed to blue for a sweet baby boy, or perhaps make the damask grey for twins, or finally, combine a couple colors such as the butter yellow and steel grey? What do you think?

And here’s a little lesson direct from Wise Geek about our favorite pattern!!!

Damask is a type of textile closely associated with drapes, tablecloths, cloth wallpapering, and upholstery. It has also historically been used to make jackets and other heavy outer garments. Classical damask is made from silk, although the term is now widely used to refer to the style of weaving, regardless as to the material used. Damask is characterized by a background of lustrous fabric against which raised designs appear. Many pieces of antique upholstered furniture are covered in damask fabric, which is how many consumers become acquainted with this fabric.

The patterns used in damask are often geometric or botanical in theme, although the pattern may also integrate animals or simple scenes. The weaving style originated in Asia, spread across the Middle East, and reached into Europe thanks to the efforts of traders like Marco Polo. By the 12th century, the fabric had been named after Damascus, which was quickly rising to fame as a center of textile production. The ornate fabrics exported from Damascus were well known, leading many people to associate the fabric with the city. Italy also housed numerous well known manufacturers of damask.

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